Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Favorites from the IQA Festival in Houston

Everyone's "Houston" is different: if you look around on Facebook or the blogs and see the quilts that people are posting, it is obvious that we each see such different things!

I'm just going to post pictures...I'm a little overwhelmed, still, to do anything else!

This is a detail from A Pocket Full of Paisleys, by Lorilynn King.  It was in the Embellished Quilts category and my favorite of the bunch.

Here is a look at the whole quilt.

And here is the embellished quilt that won the category.

This stretched my notions of what embellishment is, for sure.

This quilt was masterfully conceived and executed.

This was my other favorite in the Embellished category, Redwork Babies by Nancy Hovis and Jackie Herbert.  Just exceptional work!


The Second Place winner in the Mixed Techniques category is by Masa Yamagimoto.  It is called "Pray  for the Land of Green".

She stood serenely smiling at us all; she did not know English, nor need it!  Her presence was very graceful and look at her quilt!

She folded it back so we could see the intricate lattice work border, and also the hand quilting.

 The commitment to detail and perfection is mind blowing.

Down to the subtle gold embroidery...  I found this to be quiltmaking at the very highest level.  I respectfully gave her a small bow when I left, and her bow to me...well, it was so gorgeous, sweet, and dignified.  It made a deep impression on me.

Another Japanese artist made this quilt, called "Wind".  Masanobu Miyama's piece is about 18" X 20", I would say.

The Texans, by Patricia Styring, was a very popular quilt.  The way it conveys its narrative is superb, I think.

Here is a detail.  What a light touch she has!

I am finding myself drawn to more traditional patterns and quiltmaking techniques these days.  "Recycled Ties: No Necks Needed" by Virginia Anderson just delighted me.

Here's a detail.  So yummy.  And what perfect control she had of that wiggly silk!

Another traditional quilt that I loved was actually a one patch, so simple but so effective.

(Part of) Indigo Trips Around the World by Anabeth Dolins.

And not all the quilts I saw and loved were in the exhibit.  There was also an amazing one in Julie Silber's booth, The Quilt Complex.

There's Julie on the right, utterly delighted by this unusual quilt.

So there you have it, my eccentric selections, winnowed from hundreds!
If you love quilts, if you can, go to the big Festival in Houston at least once....









16 comments :

Deb Hardman said...

Someday I will go too. Thanks for sharing these beauties Allie! They are awesome!

Sandi said...

So glad you shared these quilts! I loved all of them but the quilt made by the Japanese Lady was absolutely stunning! Some day I'll get to Houston.....someday.......

Anonymous said...

I really think the Japanese Lady's quilt should have won first prize. The first place winner was great, but this lady beat them hands down!

maureenc said...

Still it remains on my Bucket List: a trip to Houston. Your photos have rekindled the dream!

Sande said...

What a bunch of beauties! Thanks for showing some. I'll probably never get to the show, but seeing some on the internet is fun. So glad you were able to attend.

Rebecca Grace said...

Yamagimoto's quilt is breathtaking! I am so smitten by what Japanese quiltmakers are doing today. There have been some really spectacular Japanese quilts featured in QNM over the past few years, usually on the cover -- traditional inspiration, but with a more muted color palette, and definitely pushing the limits of what is possible in piecing and applique, on another plane entirely from what most of us are capable of. So, here is my question -- how are so many Japanese women learning and mastering the craft at this high level? Who are their teachers? I wish I could learn to make something just a fraction of what she has created, but where would I go to learn those skills? You know, in a class I took with Harriet Hargrave in the spring, she was saying that there is a real lack of classes at quilting shows where you can learn basic skills, that everything now is project-based classes and that is creating a whole generation of quilters with a "get it done, good enough, looks good from galloping by on horseback" mentality who lack the skills to be able to execute advanced quiltmaking. I wonder if the culture of quiltmaking is different in Japan? I mean, the patience and perseverance alone required to create this magnificent top and then to hand quilt it is just anathema to American fast-food, quilt-in-a-day mentality. I wish I could learn quilting in Japan. :-) Thanks for sharing your pictures so we can all get a vicarious glimpse of the show through your eyes!

Judy S. said...

That must have been an amazing show. Lucky you to see it in person. Thanks for sharing your great photos, Allie.

Allison Aller said...

Rebecca Grace, what a great subject you have raised. I don't know much about Japanese culture, but I do know that the way they approach needlework--and by extension, quilting--is very different than our tradition. Their instruction is very formal, based on a Master/Student relationship. Think of it like martial arts training: you practice what your Master tells you until you are proficient enough to move on. Harriet Hargrave would approve! As do I...

Key word? PRACTICE. Second key word? RECEPTIVITY (to the instructor)

I also think that because living space is so tight there, that one project taking years does not take up much room!

But most of all, it is their cultural norm of great discipline that produces masterpieces like this quilt...at least, that is how it looks to me. ;-)

NickiLee said...

thank you for sharing such beautiful works of art. I am always amazed at the creativity and talent made by hand. I too have also wondered why it is that so many over in Europe/Asia have such precise talents - perfection!

mamiblues (Fina) said...

Que maravilla tus trabajos!!!
Y el reportaje de los quilts de Houston.....
Gracias.
Saludos.

Lorilynn King said...

I'm so glad you enjoyed looking at my quilt! Even though it did not win a prize, I have been overwhelmed by all the positive feedback I've received from people that saw it in Houston!

Susan Elliott said...

Oh the tie and the dog!!! Thanks for sharing your finds. I hope to get there one day...

moumita sen said...

Dawn the role of Gift Basket with some amazing Flowerss secial arrangements as offered to those living far away in Germany along with the contents of the website that comes loaded with Plants chocolates.

Gerry Perdue said...

I have just seen some of the quilts from Houston on this site. Breathtaking!!!!! There are no words for the level of quilting and piecing here. I know with my health I will never get there. So thank you for posting them and sharing there beauty. Did the tie quilt have a pattern? I know it was paper piece. My husband has many ties. He is retired now so doesn't have any use for them. With that idea I sure do. Thanks again.

Fruit Jar Nicky said...

FYI, if I'm not mistaken, "Recycled Ties: No Necks Needed" by Virginia Anderson is actually a paper pieced Karen Stone pattern called "Untitled."

lsquared said...

Hi, I'm so glad you liked my "Pocket Full of Paisleys" quilt! It didn't win a prize at Houston but I had so much fun making it.... Now the pressure is on to come up with another one that's even better LOL!