Sunday, May 26, 2013

New Project: Broderie Perse Meets Crazy

These days I am wanting to return to my 40-years-of-quilting roots, using cottons. Who knows why?  Never question the Muse!  But I will always have handwork and crazy quilting involved in everything I make, in one way or another....

I spent years back in the day making Broderie Perse style wall hangings...you know, where you cut out a printed image and applique it onto a background fabric.  Well, I love and miss that technique so I decided to indulge in it for my new quilt.  It will be the focal point in the center.  I'm adding some other elements to it, too...have a look so far.

It started with a border I had on hand from another quilt that didn't get used, combining vintage blocks and fabrics--with a few repros mixed in--and some vintage hexies I got off Ebay...


So this sets the stage..
Next, see that floral fabric folded up on the floor beneath the quilt? It's been calling to me....(It too was an Ebay find...)



I fused some SoftFuse fusible web by Shades Textiles onto the back of the floral fabric before cutting.  This prevented fraying while cutting and then later, wrinkling or shifting when sewing.  I also used a new pair of pointy scissors.  Sharp scissors are a  must here.
I had my cut-out on a small mat that I could rotate and move around as I snipped, so I never had to move the fabric.  Keeping it flat helped prevent any stress on those fragile cut out stems.


Once it was fused onto the background fabric (which is a vintage table cloth, stabilized with fusible knit interfacing), the sewing began....I used YLI silk thread in the top in a new size #60 needle; the bobbin had a matching cotton machine embroidery thread.  My buttonhole stitch was set to 1.5 wide, 1.5 long, and away I went.


It got pretty detailed...but that is what makes Broderie Perse so special.  This rosebud is about 2 1/2" long.


All nice and sewn down, perfectly flat, no fraying...Yay! It measures about 16" wide by 21 1/2" long.

I'm making this the focal point of the quilt.


Next I need to applique that whole center section down onto a muslin foundation.  I cannot deal with those hexies any other way!  Plus, you know they're going to get buttonholed anyways...

The large white areas will be crazy-pieced with a great bundle of shirting from Newcastle Fabrics, "Margo's Favorite Shirtings".  (Scroll down on the link.)

And yes, I will EVEN quilt this!  That Sweet 16 is waiting, waiting....



5 comments :

Rebecca Grace said...

I love your broderie perse! This is a technique that has been around awhile, isn't it? How did quilters prevent raw edges from fraying on this kind of appliqué before fusibles came along?

More questions: What kind of presser foot are you using for that blanket stitch appliqué? Wouldn't an open toe foot make it easier to see what you're doing?

And finally -- what exactly does this Sweet 16 do? Is it a longarm machine where the quilt stays put and the machine is moving, or is it just a deep-throated "regular" machine that stays put while you move the fabric to quilt?

Allison Aller said...

In answer to Rebecca...

Broderie Perse is old, old, old...I'm thinking the 1840's, maybe earlier...when quilters had those glorious Chintz fabrics from India. They turned under all their edges so didn't get the detail we get from fusing. They would often use a background the same color as the background of the print they were appliqueing..so they would blend together.

I don't think I have an open toed presser foot for my Pfaff, but your are right, I would be able to see much better if I did!

The Sweet 16 is not a long arm...the needle is stationary and you move your fabric around under it..there is so much room, it is great. I love it because you can use both hands to push the fabric around, not just one...

Suztats said...

OOOooohOoooh! Fabulous beginning. Looking forward to more eye candy!

Rian said...

O that looks like fun! I love Broderie Purse, haven't seen it in a long while. Can't wait to see this morph into another Allie Masterpiece.

ZielonaMila said...

Beautiful, great job:) Greetings